13 Comments
Jun 12Liked by Su Terry

Re. the country stereotypes joke - a musician friend has a t-shirt with that printed on it.

My experience is that all the bands I've been in are full of jokers - whenever we get together for rehearsals or gigs or whatever the jokes, puns, banter and witticisms are flying. Sometimes even getting work done in rehearsal suffers, and there's been times when I thought we might be better off trying to make it as a comedy team. Is it like that for other musicians? or am I in my own bubble?

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You're not alone--it's a musician thing. We are the kings of comedy 😉

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I have distinct memories of watching old Laurel and Hardy shorts with my grandfather. I sat with my nose to the television screen, and he sat in an armchair behind me. I could hear his laughter roll over my shoulders. Every time I watch Laurel and Hardy it brings me such joy!

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Greer Barnes pretty funny too. Thanks.

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When I read Cousins’ book as a young student, I thought if it isn’t true it ought to be. Caveats from British studies to the contrary notwithstanding, I recommend laughter to the ill — along with any other therapy that does no harm. In many ways, I think, we can cure ourselves, though not always. Thanks for the reflection. Heaven / Hell joke is spot on.

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And, Laughter Yoga! https://www.laughteryoga.org

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Two things, Su. One - I bear a striking resemblance to the laughing Buddha. Where did you get that photo of me? Two - Greer Barnes is a clone of Dave Chapelle. And that's okay, we can use more Dave Chapelle's. The funniest (bleep) out there.

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I noticed the resemblance! Dave Chappelle also great.

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Thanks for sharing Greer Barnes. That white woman bit was funny.

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I have to second what Herr Forkenspoon said. I could use more laughs in my life now.

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by comparrison to this comdedian, I'll go for Night at the Opera and Blazing Saddles.

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I recently rewatched *A Night at the Opera* for the umpteenth time, and it never gets old. *Blazing Saddles* holds a special place in my heart. In the early '70s, while returning from Fire Island on the LIRR, I happened to sit next to Mel Brooks. After expressing my admiration for his work, he initially said he was too busy to chat. However, about fifteen minutes later, he told me he had just finished the script for a new film, *Blazing Saddles*. Then, to the bewilderment of the other passengers, he began acting out the entire film, playing every character, making it look like we had escaped from a mental asylum. I never laughed like that in my life.

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Great story!

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